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Schlafzimmer, Residenz München

Royal bedroom in the Residenz Palace, Munich, Bavaria

A bedroom is a private room where people usually sleep for the night or relax during the day.

Many houses in North America, Australia and Europe have at least two bedrooms—usually a master bedroom (dedicated to the heads of the household, such as a husband and wife) and one or more bedrooms for either the children or guests.

In some jurisdictions there are basic features (such as a closet and a "means of egress") which a room must have in order to be qualify as a bedroom. In many states, such as Alaska, bedrooms are not required to have closets and must instead meet minimum size requirements. Nevertheless, some real estate agents may stretch the definition when listing a home for sale.[citation needed]

In buildings with multiple self-contained housing units (e.g., apartments), the number of bedrooms varies widely. While many such units have at least one bedroom—frequently, these units have at least two—some of these units may not have a specific room dedicated for use as a bedroom. (These units may be known by various names, including studio, efficiency, bedsit, and others.)

Furniture and other items in bedrooms vary greatly, depending on taste and local tradition. For instance, a master bedroom may include a bed of a specific size (double, king or queen-sized); one or more dressers (or perhaps, a wardrobe armoire); a nightstand; one or more closets; and carpeting. Built-in closets are less common in Europe than in North America; thus there is greater use of freestanding wardrobes or armoires in Europe.

Bedding used in northern Europe (especially in Scandinavia) is significantly different from that used in North America and other parts of Europe. In Japan futons are common.

Some bedrooms also include such items as a make-up desk, television, personal computer, air conditioning and various accessories (such as lamps, telephone and an alarm clock).

Sometimes, a master bedroom is connected to a dedicated bathroom, often called an ensuite.

Children's bedroomsEdit

In addition to a bed (or, if shared by two or more children, a bunk bed), a child's bedroom may include a small closet or dressers, a toy box or computer game console, bookcase or other items.

See alsoEdit

External links Edit

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