Fandom

Wikidwelling

Ecovillage

988pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ecovillages are intentional communities with the goal of becoming more socially, economically and ecologically sustainable. Some aim for a population of 50-150 individuals because this size is considered to be the maximum social network according to findings from sociology and anthropology.[1] Larger ecovillages of up to 2,000 individuals exist as networks of smaller subcommunities to create an ecovillage model that allows for social networks within a broader foundation of support. Certain ecovillages have grown by the nearby addition of others, not necessarily members, settling on the periphery of the ecovillage and effectively participating in the ecovillage community.

Ecovillage members are united by shared ecological, social-economic and cultural-spiritual values.[2] An ecovillage is often composed of people who have chosen an alternative to centralized electrical, water, and sewage systems. Many see the breakdown of traditional forms of community, wasteful consumerist lifestyles, the destruction of natural habitat, urban sprawl, factory farming, and over-reliance on fossil fuels, as trends that must be changed to avert ecological disaster. They see small-scale communities with minimal ecological impact as an alternative. However, such communities often cooperate with peer villages in networks of their own (see Global Ecovillage Network for an example). This model of collective action is similar to that of Ten Thousand Villages, which supports the fair trade of goods worldwide.

DefinitionEdit

In 1991, Robert Gilman set out a definition of an ecovillage that was to become a standard. Gilman defined an ecovillage as a:

  • human-scale
  • full-featured settlement
  • in which human activities are harmlessly integrated into the natural world
  • in a way that is supportive of healthy human development, and
  • can be successfully continued into the indefinite future.[3]

In recent years, Gilman has stated that he would also add the criterion that an ecovillage must have multiple centres of initiative.

HistoryEdit

The modern-day desire for community was most notably characterized by the communal movement of the 1960s and 1970s, which became more focused and organized in the co-housing and ecovillage movements of the mid-1980s. Then, in 1991, Robert and Diane Gilman co-authored a seminal study called "Ecovillages and Sustainable Communities" for Gaia Trust. Today, there are ecovillages in over 70 countries on six continents.[4]

CharacteristicsEdit

Ecovillages are "urban or rural communities ... who strive to integrate a supportive social environment with a low-impact way of life." Although there is no blueprint for realizing this goal, ecovillages may integrate various aspects of ecological design: ecological building, alternative energy, environmentally benign manufacturing or production, permaculture (landscaping designed to mimic nature and to provide the community with food, fibre and fuel), and community building practices.[5] The hindrance of restrictive policies such as zoning and building codes to the development of sustainable housing and infrastructure in urban areas in particular is discussed. It is argued that the ecovillage movement provides some of the most relevant work and knowledge available for moving into a more sustainable future.[6]

The principles on which ecovillages rely can be applied to urban and rural settings, as well as to developing and developed countries. Advocates seek a sustainable lifestyle (for example, of voluntary simplicity) for inhabitants with a minimum of trade outside the local area, or ecoregion. Many advocates also seek independence from existing infrastructures, although others, particularly in more urban settings, pursue more integration with existing infrastructure. Rural ecovillages are usually based on organic farming, permaculture and other approaches which promote ecosystem function and biodiversity. Ecovillages, whether urban or rural, tend to integrate community and ecological values within a principle-based approach to sustainability, such as permaculture design.[7]

An ecovillage usually relies on:

The goal of most ecovillages is to be a sustainable habitat providing for most of its needs on site. However self-sufficiency is not always a goal or desired outcome, specifically since self-sufficiency can conflict with goals to be a change agent for the wider culture and infrastructure. Its organization also usually depends upon some instructional capital or moral codes - a minimal civics sometimes characterized as eco-anarchism:

The term ecovillage should not be confused with micronation, a strictly legal, not infrastructural, concept.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Hill, R. and Dunbar, R. (2002). "Social Network Size in Humans." Human Nature 14(1): 53-72. Retrieved on: 2008-04-09.
  2. Van Schyndel Kasper, D. (2008). "Redefining Community in the Ecovillage." Human Ecology Review 15:12-24. Retrieved on: 2009-08-27.
  3. Gilman, Robert (Summer, 1991). "The Eco-village Challenge". In Context. Retrieved on: 2008-04-09.
  4. Taggart, Jonathan. "inside an ecovillage: born of aligned ecological values and design, ecovillages are found in over 70 countries around the world.nside an ecovillage: born of aligned ecological values and design, ecovillages are found in over 70 countries around the world.http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6685/is_5_35/ai_n39169482/?tag=content;col1
  5. Bundale, Avril. "Greening together: the ecovillage movement grows from grassroots to mainstream." http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6685/is_5_30/ai_n29144738/?tag=content;col1
  6. Bundale, Avril. "Greening together: the ecovillage movement grows from grassroots to mainstream. http://www.alchemicalnursery.org/index2.php option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=37&Itemid=27
  7. Holmgren, David. "The Essence of Permaculture." Retrieved on: 2008-04-09

Further readingEdit

Books
  • Christian, D. 2003. Creating a Life Together: Practical Tools to Grow Ecovillages and Intentional Communities New Society Publishers. ISBN 0-86571-471-1
  • Dawson, Jonathan (2006) Ecovillages: New Frontiers for Sustainability. Green Books. ISBN 1903998778
  • Hill, R. and Dunbar, R. 2002. "Social Network Size in Humans." Human Nature, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 53–72.
  • Jackson, H. and Svensson, K. 2002. Ecovillage Living: Restoring the Earth and Her People. Green Books. ISBN 1-903998-16-6
  • Walker, Liz. 2005 EcoVillage at Ithaca: Pioneering a Sustainable Culture. New Society Publishers ISBN 0865715246
Articles

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
Imported from Wikipedia

This page is being imported from Wikipedia, to create a Wikidwelling stub or article. These steps need to be completed:

  1. Sections not relevant to Wikidwelling can be deleted, or trimmed to a brief comment. Note: Image redlinks should not be removed
  2. Redlinks to articles unlikely to be created on Wikidwelling can be unlinked. (leave links to locations and institutions.)
  3. Categories may need to be adapted or removed - e.g. "people born in the 1940s". Redlinked categories are not a problem.
  4. Templates not used on Wikidwelling should be deleted, like all the interwiki links ({{de:...}}, {{fr:...}},
  5. When these first tasks are basically done, you can remove this template, writing {{Attrib Wikipedia | article name}} in place of this {{Attrib Wikipedia raw | article name}} at the bottom (simply remove "raw").
    You can also:
  6. Move to a section "External links" all Wikimedia project-related templates (e.g. {{Commons}}, {{Commons category}}, {{Wiktionary}}, etc. ).
  7. Add more specific content (related to the Wikidwelling topic) to the article, insert videos from YouTube, etc.

Pages with this template.


The original article was at Ecovillage. The list of authors can be seen in the history for that page. The text of Wikipedia is available under the CC-BY-SA 3.0 license.


Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.