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  • Temporary framing
  • Some applications in timber frame construction

Half lapEdit

File:Woodworking-joint-lap.gif

Half lap joints are used extensively in construction and cabinetry for framing. They are quick and easy to make and provide reasonable strength through good long grain to long grain gluing surface. The shoulders provide some resistance to racking (diagonal distortion). They may be reinforced with dowels or mechanical fasteners to resist twisting.

ApplicationsEdit

  • Frame assembly in cabinet making - particularly when frame members are not to be shaped after joining.

End lapEdit

Also known simply as a pull lap, it is the basic form of the lap joint and is used when joining members end to end either parallel or at right angles. When the joint forms a corner, as in a rectangular frame, the joint is often called a corner lap. This is the most common form of end lap and is used most in framing.

For a half lap in which the members are parallel, the joint may be known as a half lap splice. This is a splice joint and is an alternative to scarfing when joining shorter members end to end.

Both members in an end lap have one shoulder and one cheek each.

Use for:

  • Internal cabinet frames
  • Visible frames when the frame members are to be shaped

Cross lapEdit

The main difference between this and the basic half lap is that the joint occurs in the middle of one or both members, rather than at the end. The two members are at right angles to each other and one member may terminate at the joint, or it may carry on beyond it. When one of the members terminates at the shin , it is often referred to as a Tee lap or middle lap. In a cross lap where both members continue beyond the joint, each member has two shoulders and one cheek. For a Tee lap, one of the members has only one shoulder.

Use for:

  • Internal cabinet frames
  • Simple framing and bracing

Dovetail lapEdit

This is a lap in which the housing has been cut at an angle which resists withdrawal of the stem from the cross-piece.

Use for:

  • Framing applications where tension forces could pull the joint apart

Mitred half lapEdit

This is a variation of the end lap which shows a mitre on the face of the finished work.

The mitred half lap is the weakest version of the joint because of the reduced gluing surface.

Use for:

  • Visible framing applications where a mitred corner is desired

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit


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The original article was at Lap joint. The list of authors can be seen in the history for that page. The text of Wikipedia is available under the CC-BY-SA 3.0 license.


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