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File:Xeriscape03.png

Xeriscaping and xerogardening refers to landscaping and gardening in ways that reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental water from irrigation. It is promoted in regions that do not have easily accessible, plentiful, or reliable supplies of fresh water, and is gaining acceptance in other areas as climate patterns shift.

The word xeriscaping is a portmanteau of xeros (Greek for "dry") and landscaping, and Xeriscape is used for this style of garden.

Plants whose natural requirements are appropriate to the local climate are emphasized, and care is taken to avoid losing water to evaporation and run-off. While many Denver Water employees helped coin the term xeriscape, Xeriscape and the xeriscape logo are not registered trademarks of Denver Water, the water department of Denver, Colorado.[1] They were created by the Front Range Xeriscape Task Force of Denver Department in 1978.[1] The specific plants used in xeriscaping depend upon the climate. Some common plants used in Western xeriscaping are agave, cactus, lavender, juniper, sedum and thyme.

In some areas, terms such as water-conserving landscapes, drought-tolerant landscaping, zeroscaping, and smart scaping are used instead.

AdvantagesEdit

File:Optuniainbloom.jpg
  • Lowers consumption of imported or ground water.
    • More water available for other domestic and community uses and the environment.
  • Less time and work needed for maintenance effort, with gardening simpler and less stressful.
    • Little or no lawnmowing
  • Xeriscape plants in appropriate planting design, and soil grading and mulching, takes full advantage of rainfall retention.
  • When water restrictions are implemented, by municipality or water costs, xeriscape plants will tend to survive and thrive, while more ornamental plants may be unable to adapt.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Bulletin AZ1048
  • Landscape Plants for the Desert Climate, 2004, AMWUA

External linksEdit

Wikipedia
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